Teacher Development and Instructional Strategies Survey (TDISS)

The Teacher Development and Instructional Strategies Survey (TDISS) measures the perceptions of teaching staff about their classroom practices, professional expertise, and school climate. The TDISS has ten sections.

  • Section A contains demographic items.
  • Section B, consisting of 28 items, solicits information from teaching staff on the extent to which the statements describe their classroom practices. These statements are based on practices aimed at improving students' personal and intellectual development. The response scale for this section is “Not at all,” “Seldom,” “Sometimes,”  “Most of the time” and “All the time.”
  • Section C, consisting of 16 items, measures three aspects of the school climate: Student-Teacher Relationships, Safety, and Principal Leadership. The response scale for this section is “Strongly Disagree,” “Disagree,” “Not Sure,”  “Agree,” and “Strongly Agree.”
  • Section D, taken from the Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale developed by M. Tschannen-Moran and A. Woolfolk Hoy (2001), asks teaching staff to indicate the extent to which they feel that they can perform the behaviors described in each statement. This section is intended to measure teachers’ self-efficacy in classroom management. The response scale for this section is “Nothing,” “Very Little,” “Some Influence,” Quite a bit” and “A Great Deal.” This section contains 8 items.
  • Section E, which deals with curriculum alignment, is composed of 7 items and asks teaching staff to indicate how confident they feel, individually or as part of a team, that they can perform the behaviors described in the items. The response scale for this section is “Not Confident,” “A Little Confident,” “Somewhat Confident,”  “Confident” and “Extremely Confident.”
  • Section F, Instructional Models, asks teaching staff to indicate how confident they feel that they can perform the behaviors described in the items. The response scale for this section is “Not Confident,” “A Little Confident,” “Somewhat Confident,”  “Confident” and “Extremely Confident.”
  • Section G, Peer Collaboration, asks teaching staff to indicate the extent to which the statements in the section describe their relationship with colleagues. The response scale for this section is “Not at all,” “Rarely,” “Sometimes,”  “Most of the time” and “All the time.”
  • Section H, District Support, asks teaching staff to indicate the extent to which they feel that the activities described in the statements occurred during the past year. The response scale for this section is “Not al all,” “Rarely,” “Sometimes,” “Most of the time” and “All the time.”

The responses on all the scales are coded so that the most positive option receive the highest score and the least positive response, the lowest; for example: All the time=4, Most of the time=3, Sometimes=2, Once in a while=1, and Never=0. The TDISS subscales are listed in Table 1, with the items that define them. All of the subscales are scored in the positive direction; the higher the mean score, the more favorable respondents view it. The mean score can range from a high of 4.0 to a low of 0.0. For example, if Student-Teacher Relationships has a mean score of about 3.7, this means that most teachers agree or strongly agree that students respect them and can communicate with them, and that they (the teachers) help and encourage the students. The TDISS is meant for all teaching staff including teaching assistants.

Before computation of the mean scores, the scores for School Safety items Sf1, Sf2, Sf3, Sf4 and Sf5 were reversed in the following manner: 0 is changed to 4, 1 is changed to 3, 2 remains 2, 3 is changed to 1, and 4 is changed to 0.

The mean score on each subscale represents the sum of the average score of each person on the set of items defining the variable (see table 1), divided by the number of people responding to that subscale. For example, the score of each student on each of the Student-Teacher Relationship items would be added, and then divided by the number of items (6) to obtain each person's mean score on Student-Teacher Relationship. Each person's mean score would be summed and divided by the number of persons responding, to get the overall mean for Student-Teacher Relationship.

Reference

  • Tschannen-Moran, M. and Woolfolk Hoy, A., 2001. Teacher efficacy: capturing an elusive construct. Teaching and Teacher Education 17(7), October 2001, pp. 783-805.